Addiction to Nasal Decongestants Based on Α-Adrenoceptor Agonists Case Series and Literature Review

  • Ana Fulga ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati
  • Andrei Zenovia ”Sf. Apostol Andrei” Emergency Clinical Hospital of Galati
  • Doriana Cristea Ene ”Sf. Apostol Andrei” Emergency Clinical Hospital of Galati
  • Constantin Stan ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati
  • Dorel Firescu ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati
  • Iuliu Fulga ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati
Keywords: nasal decongestant; nasal obstruction; OTC; addiction; psychiatric disorders

Abstract

Otorhinolaryngologists describe nasal obstruction as a common symptom, moreover a prolonged use of nasal decongestants based on α-adrenoceptor agonists lead to a vicious circle of addiction. This addiction is favoured by easy access to this variety of over-the-counter medications, which are often considered risk-free. The patient may experience a spectrum of mental disorders when deprived of the agent of his addiction, which can range from moderate discomfort to panic attacks or even hallucinations. In this article, we present an analysis of a series of cases of patients who chronically abuse nasal decongestants, and a review of the literature.

Author Biographies

Ana Fulga, ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Clinical Department

Andrei Zenovia, ”Sf. Apostol Andrei” Emergency Clinical Hospital of Galati

Department of Otorhinolaryngology

Doriana Cristea Ene, ”Sf. Apostol Andrei” Emergency Clinical Hospital of Galati

Department of Otorhinolaryngology

Constantin Stan, ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Clinical Department

Dorel Firescu, ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Clinical Department

Iuliu Fulga, ”Dunarea de Jos” University of Galati

Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Clinical Department

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Published
2021-11-18
Section
Entrepreneurial Perspectives