Arms Trading and Weapons Proliferation in Africa: Implications for Nigeria

  • Ejiroghene Augustine Oghuvbu Covenant University
Keywords: Africa; implications; Nigeria; Proliferation; SALWs

Abstract

This study investigates the proliferation of Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALWs) in Africa and its implications for Nigeria.  SALWs are prominent classes of weapons due to their portability and capacity to ensure defence. As such they are in high demand and are also produced in large numbers. However, these weapons are also illicitly trafficked and transported across state borders. Africa is not excluded as 100 million SALWs are trafficked in the continent. The study adopts the failed state theory to explain the proliferation of weapons and their effects. The study employs the qualitative research method and utilises the case study research design. The study draws data from secondary sources which include already published books, book chapters, academic journals, newspapers, and internet sources. As its method of data analysis, the study adopts thematic analysis, segmenting data retrieved into themes following the objectives of the study. The findings of the study reveal that the proliferation of SALWs is an enabler for insurgency, militancy, and crime in Nigeria. The study recommends that strict monitoring and surveillance be instituted at the countries and illegal access roots to the country be blocked to discourage the transportation of illegal arms.

Author Biography

Ejiroghene Augustine Oghuvbu, Covenant University

Department of Political Science and International Relations

College of Leadership Development Studies

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Published
2020-11-18
Section
Articles